Summary of Breakout Sessions
Summary of Breakout Sessions

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Session 4: Threats to Queensnakes and their Habitat
Session 4: Threats to Queensnakes and their Habitat

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Queensnake swimming
Queensnake swimming

Maitland River, Ontario. Photo by S. Sztricsko

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Summary of Breakout Sessions
Summary of Breakout Sessions

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Welcome. We are excited that the Queensnake Collaborative successfully hosted the first Canadian Crayfish Snake Symposium virtually on March 10, 2022. We wish to thank all attendees and speakers. The symposium included researchers, conservationists, and interest groups across North America that are interested in the biology & ecology of the group of snakes referred to as Crayfish Snakes. This group includes, the Queensnake (Regina septemvittata), Graham's crayfish snake (Regina grahami), the Glossy Crayfish Snake (Liodytes rigida), and the Striped Crayfish Snake (Liodytes alleni).

Scope

The scope of this symposium is to provide a forum where Crayfish Snake research, conservation efforts, and experiences can be shared. Although, our focus is on the recovery of the Queensnake in Canada, as it is the only Crayfish Snake in Canada, we anticipate that there will be lessons learned through the efforts to conserve other similar species of Crayfish Snakes. Further, we anticipate that knowledge from other fields, such as crayfish and watershed ecology, will be important for Queensnake conservation.  The sharing and discussion of existing knowledge will be synthesized to direct future research and conservation actions required to realize the vision of sustainable and thriving  Queensnake populations throughout their distribution. We acknowledge that different knowledge systems are important to achieve our aim and exercise an inclusive participation.

Who is the Queensnake Collaborative?

The Queensnake Collaborative is a Canadian based group formed in 2011. We are committed to increasing the knowledge and understanding of biological processes that affect Queensnake biology and therefore conservation. Our aim is to conduct and facilitate research on Queensnake population dynamics and genetics, and the interaction between Queensnake and the environment, such as prey availability, diseases and pollution.